'Resident Evil 6,' 'Marvel vs. Capcom: Origins' - Omaha.com
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“Resident Evil 6” has the player battling a zombie apocalypse but leaves something to be desired in the area of game-play instruction.


VIDEO GAME REVIEWS

'Resident Evil 6,' 'Marvel vs. Capcom: Origins'



Resident Evil 6

Quality: ★★½ (out of four)

Publisher: Capcom

Rating: M for blood and gore, intense violence, nudity, strong language and suggestive themes

Platform: Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3

Price: $59.99

“Resident Evil 6” returns players to a familiar place — at least those players who played installments four and five. We get zombies, over the shoulder shooting, plenty of melee and a heaping amount of traps and puzzles.

With this installment in the zombie-killing franchise, you’ll be brought back to some of the mechanics that you’re familiar with. The game never explains the other mechanics to you. (My copy also didn’t have a manual, so there’s that.)

Before we go there, let’s start with some of the good stuff.

For the first time in a few entries in the series, we have a “Resident Evil” story that brings back actual zombies, a widespread zombie infection and consequences for the larger world. The opening scenes of Leon’s chapter (there are three initial playable chapters with different protagonists, another will unlock after beating the first three) show him in a very sticky situation involving the president. The story unravels from there.

For the first time I can remember, a “Resident Evil” game made me jump in my seat with some scares. And I was happy to see some crazy boss fights. (Repeat these words after me: “zombie shark.”)

The combat can also be frenetic and you’ll occasionally feel overwhelmed, which is sort of the point of a zombie/survival horror game.

It’s really fun. That is, it’s really fun if you can look past some of the game’s little annoyances, which can be hard because there are so many little problems that it becomes incredibly frustrating to play.

The game moves more or less on a rail: move down one long trail and shoot things as you go. That’s fine, but sometimes it was easier to sprint past all the baddies than actually stay and shoot them, which kind of defeats the purpose of playing the game, right?

I also found issue with the controls, specifically that the game didn’t tell me how they worked. The initial section of the game, which in any game almost always acts as a tutorial, explained some very, very basic parts: How to shoot, how to run. I didn’t know how to do just about everything else, especially how stamina and health work, which is a problem in a game where everything’s trying to kill you.

My computer-controlled partner also gave me fits. It went well when I had a friend play as my partner on Xbox live, but when the computer controlled my partner, it kept getting stuck. The AI partner could be helpful — knocking down zombies and reviving me when I went down — but she got me killed at least a dozen times in one spot. It got so bad that I had to knock down the difficulty.

It was a fun game, but it doesn’t compare to its predecessors. Hopefully, they right the ship for the inevitable “Resident Evil 7.”

— Kevin Coffey

Marvel vs. Capcom: Origins

Quality: ★★★ (out of four)

Publisher: Capcom

Rating: T for partial nudity and violence

Platform: Xbox 360 and PlayStation 3

Price: 1,200 Microsoft Points on XBLA or $14.99 on PSN

Did you ever wonder where games like “Marvel vs. Capcom 3,” the over-the-top and flashy fighting game, got their start? Here you go.

Very simply, this is a port of two fighting games to current consoles that have spawned a franchise: “Marvel Super Heroes,” where Marvel Comics heroes such as Wolverine and Spider-Man battle it out, and “Marvel vs. Capcom,” where some of the same Marvel heroes fight folks such as Mega Man and Ryu from “Street Fighter.”

If you’ve played them before, you’ll notice that not much has changed. Sure, you can play online now, which is fun, and there are a few new non-gameplay features, but the actual game is essentially the same.

The port is great. The graphics looked fantastic on my high-definition TV and the games are the same as I remember them.

A few small gripes: I don’t know why they don’t make the ports into widescreen games. I also don’t know why they can’t make the in-game move lists specific to the console that I’m playing (in this case, an Xbox 360). For example, why is Ryu’s Hadouken move listed as “down-forward-punch” instead of “down-forward-X?” I guess I have to remember that on my own.

Anyway, it’s fun stuff. Round up a few friends (at home or online) and it becomes even more entertaining, especially with the limited character list.

— Kevin Coffey


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