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    MONDAY, Dec. 5, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Among women who experience severe hypertension during delivery admission requiring treatment, the rate of timely treatment does not vary with race/ethnicity, according to a study published in the December issue of The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety.

      MONDAY, Dec. 5, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Poor sleep quality is associated with an increased prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS)/benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), according to a study published online Oct. 24 in Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience.

        MONDAY, Dec. 5, 2022 (HealthDay News) – Mpox cases are down significantly in the United States, prompting the federal government to plan not to renew an emergency designation for the virus when it expires late next month.

          Many people have trouble sleeping from time to time. And an estimated 10 to 20 per cent of the population have serious sleep problems and resort to some form of sleep aid.

          According to a new study from researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, everyone can wake up each morning without feeling sluggish by paying attention to three key factors: sleep, exercise, and breakfast.

          China is easing some of the world’s most stringent anti-COVID controls and authorities say new variants are weaker. But they have yet to say when they might end a "zero-COVID“ strategy that confines millions of people to their homes and set off protests and demands for President Xi Jinping to resign. Commuters in Beijing and at least 16 other cities are allowed to board buses and subways without a virus test in the previous 48 hours for the first time in months. The government announced plans to vaccinate millions of elderly people. That spurred hopes for quick reopening of the country. But health experts and economists warn it will be mid-2023 and possibly 2024 before “zero COVID” ends.

          New Zealand is launching a wide-ranging inquiry into whether it made the right decisions in battling COVID-19 and how it can better prepare for future pandemics. Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said Monday the coronavirus had posed the greatest threat to the nation’s health and economy since World War II. She said now was an appropriate time to examine the government’s response with the highest level of independent inquiry. Among the questions will be whether or not New Zealand took the right approach initially by imposing strict lockdowns and border quarantine restrictions in order to try and wipe out the virus entirely.

          As Elon Musk is finding out, running a global social media platform requires more than a few good algorithms. It also presents tough decisions about what kind of content to allow, and how to handle users who break the rules. Since Musk purchased Twitter, however, the rules have become unclear and enforcement inconsistent. The platform announced it was ending its COVID-19 misinformation policy, only to say no policies had changed. Ye, the rapper formerly known as Kanye West, was banished from Twitter for posting antisemitic content, even as the platform reinstated the account belonging to a neo-Nazi leader. Social media experts say the lack of clear and enforceable content rules could hurt Twitter if users start to lose trust.

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          Need gift ideas to help with the ladies in your life? This list will surely help you make the grade.

          Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin is making clear he wants to keep the military’s COVID-19 vaccine mandate in place to protect the health of the troops, as Republican governors and lawmakers press to rescind it. This past week more than 20 Republican governors wrote to President Joe Biden asking that the administration remove the mandate. They say it has hurt the U.S. National Guard’s ability to recruit troops. Congress may consider legislation this coming week to end the mandate as a requirement to gather enough support to pass this years’ defense budget, which is already two months late. Austin says the mandate has kept the forces healthy.

          It's now a lot easier and cheaper for Americans to get hearing aids. The government recently began allowing the sale of hearing aids without a prescription. These over-the-counter hearing aids began hitting the market in October at prices that can be thousands of dollars lower than prescription hearing aids. They are for people with mild-to-moderate hearing problems — not those with more severe hearing loss. The Food and Drug Administration estimates that around 30 million people in the United States deal with hearing loss. Only about 20% of the people who could use a hearing aid seek help.

          Scientists along the West Coast are seeking action to help sunflower sea stars recover from catastrophic population declines. The Astorian reports experts say a wasting disease epidemic that started in 2013 has decimated about 95% of the population from the Aleutian Islands of Alaska to Mexico’s Baja California peninsula. The source is unknown, but some say warming waters due to human-caused climate change could have triggered the outbreak. The National Marine Fisheries Service is expected to announce by early next year whether the species should be listed under the Endangered Species Act. Without sea stars to keep them in check, sea urchins are causing a troubling decline in kelp forests that provide food and shelter.

          Noodle, a senior pug who went viral on TikTok for deciding whether it would be a bones day or a no bones day, has died. His owner, Jonathan Graziano, posted on Instagram that the 14-year-old dog died Friday. The little dog became famous in 2021 when Graziano began posting morning videos of Noodle deciding whether he was going to stand up or flop down in his soft dog bed. This coined the phrase “a no bones day” if Noodle decided to sleep in. Graziano would encourage his fans to follow his lead and treat themselves to soft pants and self care. Graziano said Noodle lived 14 and a half years and made millions of people happy.

          New York’s state health commissioner will resign Jan. 1 after 13 months in the job to return to Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Mary Bassett said in a statement Friday that she was leaving so the next commissioner can lead the department for a full four-year term under Gov. Kathy Hochul, who won election to her first full term last month. Hochul says in a statement that Bassett led the Health Department during a challenging time, battling the coronavirus, mpox and polio outbreaks. Bassett is a former New York City health commissioner and became the state commissioner in December 2021 after leaving Harvard.

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