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WEDNESDAY, Aug. 10, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatric isolated intracranial abscess and sinusitis complicated by intracranial abscess increased during the early COVID-19 pandemic, according to research published in the Aug. 5 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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TUESDAY, Aug. 2, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- The projected rates of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors and disease are expected to increase considerably by 2060, especially among racial and ethnic minorities, according to a study published in the Aug. 9 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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TUESDAY, Aug. 2, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- For patients treated with adequate bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), all high-grade (HG) Ta tumors have similar rates of BCG unresponsiveness and progression, regardless of prognostic risk factors, according to a study published in the August issue of The Journal of Urology.

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THURSDAY, July 28, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection is associated with multiple symptoms after 12 weeks, including anosmia, hair loss, ejaculation difficulty, and reduced libido, according to a study published online July 25 in Nature Medicine.

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TUESDAY, July 26, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that clinicians individualize the decision to offer counseling interventions for healthy diet and physical activity to their patients without cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. These recommendations form the basis of a final recommendation statement published in the July 26 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

MONDAY, July 25, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly half of American adults have high blood pressure — and that alone more than doubles their odds of being hospitalized if they are infected with the Omicron variant of the coronavirus, a new study revealed.

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Your job leaves you frazzled, your bank account is shrinking, and the paper is full of bad news. Rather than breaking into an (unhealthy) sweat, why not try smacking a tennis ball, going dancing, or taking a long walk? Exercise won't make stress disappear, but it can prepare your mind and body to deal with life's difficulties. In fact, many doctors are prescribing exercise to battle stress as well as depression and anxiety.

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FRIDAY, May 20, 2022 (HealthDay News) -- Dementia risk factors appear to shift with age, and experts say knowing that could help people make lifestyle changes to reduce their chances of developing the disease.

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