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Even for someone as fast as Daevonn Hall, the past few months have flown by.

The Bellevue West receiver turned 16 in April, snagged his third Power Five scholarship offer in June and has been making the rounds for camps and college visits all summer. Schools have told the Class of 2024 prospect that a strong fall could blow up his recruiting stock.

“It’s been a lot of football,” Hall said with emphasis. “A lot of football.”

On Wednesday, though, he and dozens of the region’s other top prospects took a breather. As part of the first-of-its-kind “Future 50” media days put on by former Husker Steve Warren and his training academy, players gathered inside the Mark Bowling Alley for a few hours of fun and education.

Daevonn Hall snagged his third Power Five scholarship offer in June and has been making the rounds for camps and college visits all summer.  LILY SMITH, THE WORLD-HERALD

They played laser tag, took professional photos and learned about their name, image and likeness potential. Time for media training was built in, too — the teens spread out in booths to chat with any interested reporters about life and sports.

Players’ recruiting situations were wide ranging in the space between summer circuits and a fresh season. While many of the top 2022s have committed, a swath of younger athletes are still assessing options and gearing up for what will be a pivotal few months in their careers.

Nebraska missed on the bulk of the top in-state 2022 talent but remains in the mix for most in the cycles beyond.

Recent commit Gunnar Gottula — an offensive lineman at Lincoln Southeast and one of two NU pledges in the 2023 class — said he’s been at peace since making his decision last month. He chatted with many others Wednesday who remain on his future team’s radar, whether as walk-ons or scholarship targets.

“I just tell them they’re always welcome at Nebraska and we’d love to have them,” said Gottula, who chose the Huskers over offers from multiple regional powers that Nebraska still must contend with for other players.

Elkhorn South defensive lineman/outside linebacker Maverick Noonan holds six Power Five tenders and is headed to Lincoln on Friday to watch practices. He has visited Iowa State and Missouri this week and is only ramping up what will be a yearlong tour of possible destinations.

Like many in the room Wednesday, Noonan cheered for the Huskers growing up but won’t let that affect where he ends up. He talks with Barrett Ruud — NU’s in-state recruiter — once a week.

Maverick Noonan cheered for the Huskers growing up but won’t let that affect where he ends up playing. LILY SMITH, THE WORLD-HERALD

“My dad would always make us leave at halftime when I was a kid,” Noonan said with a laugh. “His excuse was to beat the traffic.”

Hall received a Kansas State offer last month at a camp in Manhattan. He arrived late — on only a few hours of sleep after attending a different event before that — and coaches threw him off by pretending to want to time his 40-yard dash before announcing the news.

As a longtime Husker backer, Hall said he felt “ehhhh” about touring Iowa this week but enjoyed an “eye-opening” trip to Iowa City. A one-on-one conversation with coach Kirk Ferentz and seeing the football facility “floored” him.

Hall and 2024 Bellevue West teammate Daniel Kaelin attended a Nebraska recruiting event last month that led into one of its “Friday Night Lights” camps. They played a “Madden” video game against each other on a big screen inside the Hawks Center. They met coaches. Hall said he dropped a few too many balls during the FNL workouts but enjoyed the day.

“I don’t have a big dream school where I’m really high on one team,” Daniel Kaelin said. “But growing up in the area, you see a lot of Husker stuff and I’ve followed them for a while.” LILY SMITH, THE WORLD-HERALD

“I’m definitely a Nebraska fan,” Hall said. “But Iowa and K-State, I’m going to cheer for them too because they offered me.”

Kaelin — a fast-rising quarterback prospect with four Power Five offers including Nebraska after Kansas extended one last weekend — hasn’t spoken with Husker coaches in a couple of weeks and doesn’t consider them a childhood favorite after growing up in Missouri. Relationships and playing time will be important for wherever he signs.

“I don’t have a big dream school where I’m really high on one team,” Kaelin said. “But growing up in the area, you see a lot of Husker stuff and I’ve followed them for a while.”

Another in-state talent has a different sort of decision to make.

Lincoln Southeast 2023 running back Max Buettenback committed to Nebraska baseball 11 months ago but the infielder/outfielder hasn’t completely moved on from football. He added 10 pounds and an inch in the offseason — up to 195 pounds and 6-foot-1 — and continues to seek his first offer in his co-favorite sport.

“I’m still thinking about football because I love football as much as I love baseball,” Buettenback said. “Whatever season I’m in, I like that just a little bit more. To get a football scholarship would be really cool too because not many people can say they’ve gotten both. I’m still putting myself out there.”

Players filtered out of the bowling alley by midafternoon with full stomachs and an armful of T-shirts and other swag. A little wiser, too. And one day closer to whatever comes next.

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